Beautiful young woman with balloons

Level 9 Week 6

Hello dear students!

Here is the information of what we saw last class along with some practice to help you study.

This week we saw:

  • INFORMAL WORDS AND PHRASES.
  • WISHES.
  • PHRASES WITH GET.
  • THIRD CONDITIONAL.

 

Informal English

While formal English is often used when writing papers for school, cover letters to apply for a job or e-mails and letters at work, informal English is mostly used with friends, children and relatives. You see it a lot in movies and songs, as well as the internet. Examples:

Informal

Formal

SHOW UP

ARRIVE

POINT OUT

INDICATE

GET IN TOUCH WITH

CONTACT

Here is a useful link with some phrases and their meanings along with an online practice:

Formal & Informal English

This is the link for the urban dictionary. It helps you know what some informal parases mean.

Wishes

The gramatical form for wishes is the following:

Wishes about states WISH + PAST SIMPLE
Wishes about activities happening now WISH + PAST CONTINUOUS
Wishes about abilities WISH + COULD + INFINITIVE
Wishes about obligations WISH + DIDN’T HAVE TO + INFINITIVE

Parases with GET

GET can be used in a number of patterns and has a number of meanings.

TO GET + DIRECT OBJECT = TO OBTAIN, TO RECEIVE, TO BUY
TO GET + PLACE EXPRESSION = REACH, ARRIVE AT A PLACE
TO GET + ADJECTIVE = BECOME, SHOW A CHANGE OF STATE
TO GET + PREPOSITION/ADVERB = PHRASAL VERBS WITH VARIOUS MEANINGS

For more info go to this link: The verb TO GET

Third Conditional

Talks about an event in the past, that never happened or will never happen.

It can also sound like a dream, a critic or regret.

Example:

If I had lived in Canada, I would have worked as an Architect.

Condicional Clause + Result

OR

Result + Condicional Clause

CONDITIONAL OR IF CLAUSE: If + Past Perfect (had + past participle)

RESULT OR MAIN CLAUSE: would + have + past participle.

That’s all for this week.

 

See you next friday!

Prof. Maria J. Chaves

Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica

Vicerrectoría de Docencia

Unidad Ejecutora: Escuela de Ciencias del Lenguaje

Programa CONARE-Fortalecimiento del Inglés (PFI)

checking-information

Level 9 Week 5

Hello dear students!

Another week passed by… before you know it, we’ll be on week 8.

This week we saw:

Small review on reported speech.

Reported Speech: requests and imperatives.

Verb patterns – reporting verbs.

Checking information.

Here is the information seen in class, no homework this week😉 although we will have the oral quiz next friday.

Imperative Sentences

Imperative Sentences

-Commands / orders: “Come here now!”

-Directions: “Turn left on Fifth Avenue”

-Instructions: Write your account number on your check.

-Requests: Please show the client in.

-Warnings: Don’t feed your dog candy.

Here’s a video that tells you about imperatives, with an interesting title…

Reporting Imperative Sentences

Form: who + tell/ask + whom (object) + (not) + (to) infinitive.

*we use ask for requests.

Example: “Please show the client in”, said Mr. Wells to the receptionist.

Mr. Wells asked the receptionist to show the client in.

Reporting Verbs

remember the video seen in class? here it is…


On this link you will find more detailed information:

Reporting Verbs

That’s all for this week.

See you on friday!

Prof. Maria J. Chaves

Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica

Vicerrectoría de Docencia

Unidad Ejecutora: Escuela de Ciencias del Lenguaje

Programa CONARE-Fortalecimiento del Inglés (PFI)

stock-brokers

Level 9 Week 4

Hello dear students!

We are halfway there… For this blog post I prepared a small infographic on reported speech for both sentences and questions.

Then I added a small practice for this week’s lesson. Also a couple of videos on what we saw last friday.

reported-speech-infographic

The following video talks about reported speech for yes/no questions, it also talks about imperatives which we will see in class next week.

Complete the following online practice, take a screenshot of your results and send it to my e-mail:

Reported Speech Practice

Then watch the following video and on the comments section write at least 4 sentences using reported speech about what Alex said in the video. (This video also includes work vocabulary to complement what we saw in class).

And that’s it for this week. As always… any questions, let me know.

See you next friday!

Prof. Maria J. Chaves

Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica

Vicerrectoría de Docencia

Unidad Ejecutora: Escuela de Ciencias del Lenguaje

Programa CONARE-Fortalecimiento del Inglés (PFI)

week 3

Level 9 Week 3

Hello dear students!

I hope you are all well. I apologize for the little delay on this blog post.

This week we saw:

  • Phrasal Verbs
  • Wedding Vocabulary
  • Wedding Traditions
  • Asking for, giving and refusing permission

 

Phrasal Verbs

Phrasal verbs are usually two-word phrases consisting of verb + adverb or verb + preposition. Think of them as you would any other English vocabulary.

Study them as you come across them, rather than trying to memorize many at once.

Type 1

Type 2

Phrasal verbs that don’t have an object.

Example:

You two have never fallen out.

Meaning of fall out: to argue with someone and stop being friendly with them.

Phrasal verbs that always have an object. The object is always after the phrasal verb.

Example:

Olivia got over her divorces quickly.

Meaning of get over: to get better after an illness, or feel better after something or someone has made you unhappy

Type 3

Type 4

Phrasal verbs that always have an object. If the object is a noun, you can put it in the middle or after the phrasal verb.

Example:

I looked some figures up.

I looked up some figures.

Meaning of look up: to check a fact or get information about something.

**If the object is a pronoun, you must put it in the middle of the phrasal verb.

Ex: I looked them up vs. I looked up them

Phrasal verbs that have three words and always have an object. The object is always after the phrasal verb.

Example:

I tried to get out of the whole thing.

I tried to get out of it.

Meaning of get out of: to avoid doing something that you do not want to do, or to escape responsibility for something

Here is Ronnie again…


As I explained during class, there are thousands of phrasal verbs, it is just a matter of knowing when and how to use them. The rules above help you have an idea on how to place them in a sentence if they have an object or whether they are a noun or pronoun.

Here is a list (with definitions) of phrasal verbs that might come in handy for you guys:

Phrasal Verbs

Modal Verbs

The modal verbs are cancouldmaymightshallshouldwill and would.

The modals are used to do things like talking about ability, asking permission making requests, and so on.

When asking for permission…

  • After Can I…?, May I…? And Do you think I could …? We use the infinitive: May I use your phone?
  • After Do you mind if I …? And Is it OK if I …? We use the present simple: Do you mind if I watch TV? Is it OK if I borrow your bike?
  • After Would you mind if I…? We use the past simple: Would you mind if I used your motorbike this weekend?

*Remember that in this part I said that present simple and infinitive can be used with these phrases.

When giving permission…

  • We usually give permission by saying: Yes, of course; Sure, go ahead; Help yourself, etc.
  • Do you mind if…? and Would you mind if I…? Mean “Is it a problem if I do this?”. To give permission for these phrases, we usually say: No, not at all.

When refussing permission…

  • The polite way to refute something is to say “Sorry….”, “Actually…”

Here is more information on the topic:

Asking for Permission in English

Ability, permission, request and advice

Homework for Week 4:

  1. Look at the following picture, on the comments section write two paragraphs (using at least five phrasal verbs) describing the event of the wedding (like the story on page 82).

wedding-reception-lighting-photo1

2. Go to this page: Phrasal Verbs with “over” do the quiz and send me a screenshot of your results.

3. Go to this page: Ability, permission, request and advice do the exercise and send me a screenshot of your results.

 

See you all on Friday!

Prof. Maria J. Chaves

Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica

Vicerrectoría de Docencia

Unidad Ejecutora: Escuela de Ciencias del Lenguaje

Programa CONARE-Fortalecimiento del Inglés (PFI)

bucketlist2

Level 9, Week 2

Hello students!

Here is the recap of what we saw last friday in class and a little below your homework due Friday September 2nd plus topics for the listening quiz.

So, last class we saw…

  • Contacting people
  • was/were going to – was/were supposed to
  • Describing people
  • Modal verbs and making deductions

Going to vs. Supposed to


Go to the following link, complete the quiz and send a screenshot of your results to my e-mail: Going to & Supposed to.

Remember it works the other way too…

Examples:

I wasn’t supposed to attend the party but I got a last minute invitation.

I wasn’t going to go to class but I remembered I had a quiz that day.

We weren’t supposed to do the test on week 5 but there was a last minute schedule change.

They weren’t going to help us but they changed their mind at the last minute.

Describing People

For your homework, find a picture of a person that has a trait from the list below, find one picture for each of them and send them to my e-mail (try to find small sized pictures)

  • Fair skin and hair
  • Dark skin and hair
  • Red hair
  • Blonde hair
  • Grey hair
  • Dyed hair
  • Straight hair
  • Curly hair
  • Wavy hair
  • Moustache
  • Beard
  • Stripped dress
  • Flowery skirt
  • Plain tie
  • In her teens
  • In his early twenties
  • In her mid-thirties
  • In his late forties

This topic, I believe was more than clear in class, specially since most of you pick the same person to describe…🙂

Modals and making deductions (Present tense)

We use modal verbs to say how sure we are about something.

Must Might, May, Could Can’t
We use must when we feel sure that something is true because there’s very strong evidence.

He must live near here because he comes to work on foot. We don’t know where he lives but we’re sure it’s not far away.

Come inside and get warm – you must be freezing out there.

Notice that must is followed by an infinitive without ‘to’.

We use might, may or could to say that we think something is possible but we’re not sure.

Did you hear that? I think there might be a burglar downstairs. She’s not sure there’s a burglar but she thinks it’s possible.

We’ll try to get there early but we may arrive late if there’s a lot of traffic.

Don’t put it up there. It could fall off and hit someone.

Might, may and could are also followed by an infinitive without ‘to’.

We use can’t when we feel sure something is not true.

It can’t be a burglar. All the doors and windows are locked. He doesn’t know it’s not a burglar but he feels sure it’s not.

It can’t be far away now. We’ve been driving for hours. Where’s the map?

Really? He has to work on Christmas Day? He can’t feel very happy about that.

Like the other verbs, can’t is followed by an infinitive without ‘to’.

** Remember that all of these modal verbs – must, might, may, could and can’t have other uses.

Two important rules from the book:

  1. To make deductions about places we use the modal verb + infinitive.

Example: She must be on her way to San Jose.

  1. To make deductions about something happening now we use the modal verb + ing.

Example: She must be writing an e-mail in her office.

Complete the practice on the following link, and also send a screenshot of your result to my e-mail: Modals to make deductions.

Topics for the listening quiz:

  1. Listening to the news
  2. At the doctor’s office
  3. Describing people

Let me know if you have any questions.

See you next friday.

Prof. Maria J. Chaves

Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica

Vicerrectoría de Docencia

Unidad Ejecutora: Escuela de Ciencias del Lenguaje

Programa CONARE-Fortalecimiento del Inglés (PFI)

 

 

 

afp-eu0re

Welcome Level 9 Students!


Hello dear students!

Welcome to level 9. I am very happy and excited to be your teacher. I am sure we will have a great time together.

Let’s review what we saw in class in regards to evaluation and schedule:

Participation 10% 5% Class Participation 5% Oral Quiz
Week 6
Homework 10% 4 cyber-homework

2% each

2%
1 Paper-Homework
Listening Quiz 10% Week 3
Written Quiz 10% Week 5
Final Test 60% Week 8

 

Week Unit Date HW Due Date Quiz
1 9 A-D August 19th
2 10 A-B August 26th Homework 1
3 10 C-D September 2nd Homework 2 Listening Quiz
4 11 A-B September 9th Homework 3
5 11 C-D September 16th Homework 4 Written Quiz
6 12 A-B September 23rd Oral Quiz
7 12 C-D September 30th Homework 5
8 Final Test

Here are the topics seen in class (August 19th) as well as the assignment of your first homework, which is due next Friday August 26th.

***Look for the text in orange to get the instructions for your homework.

Relative pronouns for Relative Clauses

We use who and whom for people, and which for things.

We use that for people or things.

We use where for places and when for time.

We use relative pronouns to introduce relative clauses, which tell us more about people, places and things.

Please complete the exercises on the first practice seen on this link:

Clauses – relative clauses

Take a screenshot of your results and send it to my e-mail. 

Present Perfect Simple Active and Passive

A tense mostly seen in news articles, like the ones presented in class.

Active sentences in the present perfect tense have the following structure:

Subject + has/have + past participle form of the verb + object

Passive sentences in the present perfect tense have the following structure:

Object of the active sentence + has/have + been + past participle form of the verb + by + subject of the active sentence

Comment on a recent important news article on the comments section for this blog post (remember that I have to approve it first, so it will not appear once you publish it).

Connecting Words

Connecting words and phrases in English (also called ’linking’ or ‘transition’ words) are used to combine two clauses or sentences presenting contrast, comparison, condition, supposition, purpose, etc. They enable us to establish clear connections between ideas.

Most connecting words can either connect clauses within a sentence, or start a sentence to form a connection with the previous statement.

There are plenty of connecting words (even more so than the ones on your book). To give you an idea and help you practice at the same time, complete the following online practice, take a screenshot of your result and send it to my e-mail.

Connecting Words

So, to recap… Your homework is the following:

  1. Relative Clauses practice.
  2. Comentary on recent important news.
  3. Connecting words practice.

 

Remember, practice makes perfect! Put the SAP option on your TV, try to watch movies in English with English subtitles and try to find some time to do the practice sheets for this unit.

If you have any questions, comments or just want to talk, send me an e-mail!😉

See you next friday!

Prof. Maria J. Chaves

Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica

Vicerrectoría de Docencia

Unidad Ejecutora: Escuela de Ciencias del Lenguaje

Programa CONARE-Fortalecimiento del Inglés (PFI)

close-up look of A plus grade over final exam paper

The Final Test Level 2

Hello dear students!

Wow this course went by really fast!

Here are the topics for the final test:

Adjectives
Adverbs
Past simple
Irregular verbs
A / An / The
Present Continuous
All the vocabulary from the course

Examprgr

Here are some practices to help you study:

Adjectives and Adverb Practice

Irregular Verbs Practice

Present Continuous Practice

A-An-The Articles Practice

*Pay close attention as I could get some parts of the test from these practices.😉

Try to look up videos on YouTube to help you practice for the Listening and Oral part.

By the way… A good App to help you practice is Duolingo. I’m learning French and Italian!  :)

Como le decía a unos de sus compañeros el viernes pasado, he notado mucho el avance en su pronunciación y en la confianza que tienen para usar el ingles… no dejen que el miedo a equivocarse los bloquee a ser bilingües 100%. “Hay que tirarse al agua”, como decía uno de ustedes… y es super cierto, si se equivocan, no importa, ya saben como deben decirlo correctamente.

Si no llego a verlos el próximo curso, fue un gusto ser su profesora y en lo que pueda ayudarles, ya tienen mi información de contacto, me cuentan como les va en los siguientes cursos y si tienen alguna duda.

Best of luck and God bless!

Prof. Maria J. Chaves

Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica

Vicerrectoría de Docencia

Unidad Ejecutora: Escuela de Ciencias del Lenguaje

Programa CONARE-Fortalecimiento del Inglés (PFI)

virtual_classroom

The Virtual Class

Units 7C to 8B

Hey guys! Welcome to the virtual class (2×1)!

Please read the text below, watch all videos, answer all questions, quizes and book pages that I will request below. Click on “send” at the end of the lesson to send your answers. Remember as you go through this lesson that it will be part of the final test and your participation will be evaluated.

If you have any questions…. you know where to find me (quick text message or e-mail).

Enjoy the class!

Scroll down on the window embeded above to complete the lessons.

Any questions, let me know.

Finally I leave you with this awesome video…. Enjoy!

Click here for the subtitled version.

Remember we have the oral quiz this week.

See you on Friday!

Prof. Maria J. Chaves

Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica

Vicerrectoría de Docencia

Unidad Ejecutora: Escuela de Ciencias del Lenguaje

Programa CONARE-Fortalecimiento del Inglés (PFI)

update concept

Getting up to date…

Hello dear students,

After well deserved vacations, it is time to go back and face reality.

For homework number 4, you will write at least 2 paragraphs of your ideal video game or phone app. Your ideal market (the group of people it is intended for) and how you would call it and why. Drawings or logos are more than welcome. Write it on the comments section.

Homework number 5, I will bring it on Friday, since it will be pages from the book.

Ahora, en español para estar todos claros… tenemos dos clases que reponer. Podemos hacer lo planeado del sábado 23 e ir a ver donde nos acomodamos, lo único es que me preocupa porque debería también hacerles el quiz oral.  Pero bueno eso podemos verlo este viernes. Otra opción que me presentaron mis colegas es opción A. Llegar un día como a las 3 o 4 y hacer dos lecciones en una. Opción B. Hacer la clase virtual, en la que les pongo tooooda la materia de esa lección en el blog, así como ejercicios extra, videos, las unidades que tienen que hacer y disponibilidad de corregir dudas durante la semana.  Ustedes dirán que les parece mejor… pueden dejármelo saber en el grupo de WhatsApp. (voy a copiar este mensaje ahí)

Para el written quiz de este viernes, va a ser una evaluación de verbos irregulares, relax no los más difíciles pero si los más comunes.

En cuanto al oral quiz, los que ya estuvieron conmigo saben la modalidad, que es un tema espontáneo en parejas o trios donde les doy 3 minutos para prepararse y mínimo 3 para presentarlo, nada de asustarse.

Espero sus comentarios para ver que decisión tomamos.

See you on Friday!

Prof. Maria J. Chaves

Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica

Vicerrectoría de Docencia

Unidad Ejecutora: Escuela de Ciencias del Lenguaje

Programa CONARE-Fortalecimiento del Inglés (PFI)

img_3_social_icons-26.jpg-26

Homework 3 and Social Media

Hello dear students,

I am sorry for the delay on this week’s homework. Because of it, it will be short, I promise😛

Before you click on the Adjectives Practice, check out the picture below to know how the adjective order goes. We saw this on Level 1, but I just wanted to give you guys a refresher…

adjectives-word-order

Now, here is the Adjectives practice. You know the drill, take screen shots of your results and send them to my e-mail.

And then on the comments section below, just as you do on your Facebook profile, write a short description about yourself, try to include as many adjectives as possible (use the list if you want)

Also, let us know if you were able to find out if there are any free rooms in your school for July 23rd from 8am to 12pm.

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I hope you guys are having a good week!

See you on friday!

Prof. Maria J. Chaves

Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica

Vicerrectoría de Docencia

Unidad Ejecutora: Escuela de Ciencias del Lenguaje

Programa CONARE-Fortalecimiento del Inglés (PFI)